Marketing Myth: Every Author Should Blog

If you are an author, you’ve probably heard this. And there’s no question a successful blog is a great help to an author. But most blogs – well over 90% in my estimation – don’t contribute much of anything to an author’s marketing success. A successful blog requires time, long-term commitment, creativity, focus, and discipline. All these funnel creative attributes are generally in short supply and all of them can be used in other important activities such as building a speaking practice or conducting a major long-term radio push.

My point is simple. Building a successful blog, like every other activity that drives real publishing success, is challenging and requires real commitment. It can be tremendously productive, but if you don’t have the commitment, don’t bother. And if you do decide to commit to blogging, recognize that it’s a choice, a choice that will prevent you from doing something else that might also be very productive. See : aweber vs infusionsoft

So think about your skills, your book, your market,  and your interests, and develop a marketing plan that suits you best. If it does include blogging, some very helpful advice is here (thanks to Herb Schaffner for this): http://digitalbookworld.com/2010/gretchen-rubin-social-media-happiness-for-authors/#axzz0mMNa6p8e

1 thought on “Marketing Myth: Every Author Should Blog”

  1. I agree, Glen. A former client asked me if she should consider adding tweeting to her other social media outlets and I couldn’t see the point. Eventually, you’ll be the writer who does nothing but update your many status bars every couple of hours instead of being productive. It’s a fine balance, to be sure, but like you said, it’s about discipline and great content. It also helps to add that social media time into your weekly schedule and make a promise to yourself not to go beyond schedule.

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